About Hawai'i

Hawai‘i’s history has roots in many cultures. Native Hawaiians, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Portuguese, Micronesian, Pacific Island immigrants, and mainland white settlers are all represented in the state’s population. There are also many military families.

Despite the beauty and vibrant communities on the islands, it is not paradise for everyone. An estimated 6,188 residents of Hawai’i are homeless and living on beaches or in shelters. Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders comprise a disproportionate 59 percent of the homeless population, which includes 1,700 children.

Outcomes for kids in Hawai‘i public schools have historically been mediocre at best. The quality of education took an additional blow in 2009 when the state implemented “furlough Fridays,” effectively creating 4-day school weeks and reducing the overall number of instructional days for students. Parents, kids, and teachers united in outrage. A year later, furlough Fridays were eliminated, and the state passed a constitutional amendment establishing an appointed Board of Education. A new superintendent also helped create a strategic plan that won a Race to the Top grant.

Since then there has been tremendous energy and urgency around transforming the educational landscape in the state. Our corps continues to grow and partner with others in the community to help ensure that all of Hawai’i’s children have the opportunity to receive the education they deserve.

See more from Executive Director Jill Baldemor in her op-ed in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.

90

Incoming Corps Size

190

Total Corps Size

About Us

Executive Director
Prior to joining Teach For America staff, Jill practiced law at Goodsill Anderson Quinn & Stifel, LLP for seven years. A 1995 corps member, she taught second grade in New York City’s Washington Heights neighborhood. Jill holds master's and bachelor's degrees from Northwestern

Connect With Us

500 Ala Moana Blvd., Suite 3-400, Honolulu, HI 96813
150

Alums in Region

2006

Year Partnership Established